September 12, 2021

Soundtrack: Kill Bill Vol. 1 – Quentin Tarantino

A single screening of a pop culture obsessive’s homage to martial arts/grindhouse cinema is all it takes to seriously consider director Quentin Tarantino’s Kill Bill Vol. 1 as possibly film’s greatest soundtrack mash-up.
July 15, 2021

Heavy Rotation: Joni Mitchell – Court and Spark

Fusing neo-jazz with folk and rock, Joni Mitchell’s sixth studio album – Court and Spark – deftly weaves a sonic tapestry whose lyrical tenor plays counterpoint and asks the listener to weigh the costs of emotional commitment against the benefits of casual relationships.
July 8, 2021

Soundtrack: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly – Sergio Leone

Stripped of any Venerum Americana infusing typical western films of the time, The Good the Bad and the Ugly preserved cinematic focus in 1966 by remaining morally ambiguous.
May 12, 2021

Soundtrack: Arrival – Denis Villeneuve

Understanding how time limits and binds the human capacity for awareness is the key to breaking an interstellar code for a linguist and physicist in Canadian director Denis Villeneuve’s stark, contemporaneous and cerebral 2016 sci-fi thriller Arrival.
May 7, 2021

Heavy Rotation: Boards of Canada – Music has the Right to Children

Triggering an emotion may be easier with a melody than rhythm, according to brothers Mike Sandison and Marcus Eoin of Boards of Canada, but the faded patina of melancholy saturating the pair’s 1998 debut studio album Music Has The Right To Children, is as apparent in its tempo as its theme.
May 4, 2021

DJ Shadow: Endtroducing – 25th Anniversary Sample Mix

Cited as one of the best records of the nineties by most major music publications and included in Time Magazine’s list of greatest albums of all time, one of the keys to the resounding impact of DJ Shadow’s Entroducing can be found in the title of one of its less substantial cuts, a 43-second interlude entitled “Why Hip Hop Sucks in ‘96”. It kind of did.
April 3, 2021

Heavy Rotation: Paul Simon – Self Titled

By Christmas 1969, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel were tired. Tired of touring, tired of filming a TV special, tired of the grind that recording Bridge Over Troubled Water had become, but mostly, they were tired of each other. Simon felt the partnership was over. So, he did what anyone does after a breakup; he took time out to reassess.